Major News Networks: Cheetahs heading towards extinction as population crashes

Many major news networks covered this story including the BBC, Sky, Guardian, Independent, The Times, The Telegraph, The Mail, The Sun, CNN and Huffington Post. Synopses and links are below.

BBC: Cheetahs heading towards extinction as population crashes

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_93107520_cubs_creditzslThe sleek, speedy cheetah is rapidly heading towards extinction according to a new study into declining numbers.

The report estimates that there are just 7,100 of the world’s fastest mammals now left in the wild.

Cheetahs are in trouble because they range far beyond protected areas and are coming increasingly into conflict with humans.

The authors are calling for an urgent re-categorisation of the species from vulnerable to endangered.

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SKY: Cheetah sprinting to extinction with just 7,100 left in the wild – experts

A cheetah is pictured on March 22, 2013 at the private game reserve of French Damien Vergnaud in Inverdoom, 200 kms north east of Cape Town. Vergnaud runs a breeding programme for cheetahs. At the beginning of the XXth century, an estimated 100.000 cheetahs were roaming freely in Africa and Asia to decrease to about 10.000 in the wild today. AFP PHOTO / CHRISTOPHE BEAUDUFE (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE BEAUDUFE/AFP/Getty Images)

CHRISTOPHE BEAUDUFE/AFP/Getty Images

The cheetah should now be defined as “endangered” instead of “vulnerable” on a watch list of threatened species, a study says.

Experts have warned cheetahs are much more at risk of extinction than previously thought.

It is estimated that there are just 7,100 left in the wild – across just 9% of the territory they used to live in, according to a study by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).

Populations in Asia have been most affected, with only 50 of the animals left in Iran.

In Zimbabwe, cheetah numbers have plummeted by 85% in little more than a decade.

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The Guardian: Cheetah ‘more vulnerable to extinction than previously thought’

The fall in cheetah numbers has prompted calls for its status to be upgraded from ‘vulnerable’ to ‘endangered’. Photograph: Sarah Durant/ZSL/PA

Sarah Durant/ZSL/PA

Urgent action is needed to stop the cheetah – the world’s fastest land animal becoming extinct, experts have warned.

Scientists estimate that only 7,100 of the fleet-footed cats remain in the wild, occupying 9% of the territory they once lived in. Asiatic populations have been hit the hardest, with fewer than 50 surviving in Iran, according to an investigation led by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).

In Zimbabwe, cheetah numbers have plummeted by 85% in little more than a decade.

The cheetah’s dramatic decline has prompted calls for the animal’s status to be upgraded from “vulnerable” to “endangered” on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of threatened species.

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The Independent: Cheetahs, the world’s fastest land animal, heading for extinction, experts warn

John von Radowitz

independentUrgent action is needed to stop the cheetah, the world’s fastest land animal, from becoming extinct, experts have warned.

Scientists estimate that just 7,100 of the fleet-footed cats remain in the wild, occupying just nine per cent of the territory they once lived in.

Asiatic populations have been hit the hardest with fewer than 50 individuals surviving in Iran, according to a new investigation led by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).

In Zimbabwe, cheetah numbers have plummeted by 85 per cent in little more than a decade.

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CNN: Cheetahs, the world’s fastest land animals, racing toward extinction

Madison Park, CNN

Cheetahs have lost 91% of their historic habitat, which once encompassed areas throughout Africa and southwest Asia. Cheetahs have all but disappeared in Asia, with fewer than 50 remaining in Iran, according to research published in the journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Huffington Post: Cheetahs Are Far Closer To Extinction Than We Realized

The Times: Cheetahs teeter on brink of extinction

Stuart Graham

times

There are estimated to be only 7,100 cheetahs left in the wild PA:Press Association

The encroachment of humans, poaching and the trade in exotic pets has dramatically reduced the world’s cheetah population to 7,100. The cats have virtually been wiped out in Zimbabwe and Iran in the past decade, a new study has found.

Cheetahs, which are the world’s fastest land animals and can run at 29m per second, are dying out largely due to a low availability of prey. Illegal hunting, wounds inflicted by snares and demand for their skins are also contributing factors, according to the study, led by the Zoological Society of London and Panthera and Wildlife Conservation Society.

Wealthy collectors buying cubs as vanity pets and speeding motorists in game reserves such as Kruger National Park in South Africa, are also responsible for the dwindling . . .

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The Telegraph: Cheetahs facing extinction amid dramatic decline in numbers

telegraph

Scientists estimate that just 7,100 cheetahs remain in the wild Credit: PA

Urgent action is needed to stop the cheetah – the world’s fastest land animal – sprinting to extinction, experts have warned.Scientists estimate that just 7,100 of the fleet-footed cats remain in the wild, occupying just 9% of the territory they once lived in.

Asiatic populations have been hit the hardest with fewer than 50 individuals surviving in Iran, according to a new investigation led by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).

 

The Mail Online: Cheetah numbers decline as African habitat shrinks

In this Aug. 22, 2012 photo, a cheetah is photographed in the Tamboti Game Resrve, near Lephalale, South Africa. Amid population declines for many wildlife species in Africa, conservationists are sounding alarm bells for the cheetah, the fastest animal on land, where there are an estimated 7,100 cheetahs remaining across Africa and in a small area in Iran. (AP Photo/Kevin Anderson)

In this Aug. 22, 2012 photo, a cheetah is photographed in the Tamboti Game Resrve, near Lephalale, South Africa. Amid population declines for many wildlife species in Africa, conservationists are sounding alarm bells for the cheetah, the fastest animal on land, where there are an estimated 7,100 cheetahs remaining across Africa and in a small area in Iran. (AP Photo/Kevin Anderson)

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Amid population declines for many wildlife species in Africa, conservationists are sounding alarm bells for the cheetah, the fastest animal on land.

An estimated 7,100 cheetahs remain in the wild across Africa and in a small area of Iran, and human encroachment has pushed the wide-ranging predator out of 91 percent of its historic habitat, according to a study published on Monday.

Consequently, the cheetah should be defined as “endangered” instead of the less serious “vulnerable” on an official watch list of threatened species worldwide, the study said.

“This period is really crunch time for species like cheetah that need these big areas,” said Sarah Durant, a cheetah specialist at the Zoological Society of London and the lead author of the report published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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The Sun: LESSER SPOTTED The world’s fastest animal the cheetah is hurtling towards extinction thanks to hunting and the exotic pet trade

Asiatic populations have been hit the hardest hit. PA: Press Association

Asiatic populations have been hit the hardest hit. PA: Press Association

Scientists estimate that just 7,100 of the fleet-footed cats remain in the wild, occupying just nine per cent of the territory they once lived in.

Asiatic populations have been hit the hardest with fewer than 50 individuals surviving in Iran, according to a new investigation led by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).

In Zimbabwe, cheetah numbers have plummeted by 85% in little more than a decade.

The cheetah’s dramatic decline has now prompted calls for the animal’s status to be upgraded from “vulnerable” to “endangered” on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of threatened species.

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