**Please Register for Gift Aid when Donating!**

By sponsoring a resident, non-releasable cheetah you can help us cover part or all of the annual costs for caring for them. Each cheetah costs CCF an estimated £3,000 a year in care and includes food, veterinary care and pen maintenance.

CCF cares for a number of orphaned, old or injured cheetahs who cannot be released back into the wild as they do not have the skills or physical capability to survive. Although CCF is not a rescue shelter, it does accommodate these non-releasable cheetahs. If another approved home becomes available, CCF relocates these cheetahs to an alternate captive facility. However, many of these cheetahs are permanent residents of CCF.

For sponsorship of £650 or more, you will receive:

  • Two e-mail updates on your sponsored cheetah. These updates are only sent by e-mail. Please be sure to include the e-mail address of the person who should receive these cheetah updates if other than yourself.
  • a personalised sponsorship certificate
  • PLUS a personal letter of thanks from Dr. Laurie Marker

For sponsorship of £3,000 or more:

Receive all of the above plus:

  • A personalised plaque will be erected at CCF’s centre in Namibia.

Aurora

Wiggle WiggleAurora was brought to CCF as a cub only several weeks old in April 2013. A farmer found Aurora without any sign of her mother and kept her for 2 weeks before calling CCF. When she arrived at CCF her claws had been cut, she was malnourished, and was extremely frightened. Since being at CCF she has been introduced to another female cub, Rainbow, who arrived at CCF around the same time. The two have become companions and now share an enclosure.

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B2
B2 was rescued in September 2014. He was 5 months old when he was picked up near CCF Headquarters. He was caught in a cage trap on a neighboring farm and he was in good condition. When we picked B2 up he just eaten so we assume that he was with his mother at the time of capture. However, after searching for 3 days straight we were unable to find her and therefore had to bring him in to CCF as he wouldn’t have survived on his own. B2 has since been introduced to Phoenix and they have formed a very strong bond. B2 was named for B2Gold an international mining company that is currently working in Otjikoto, 300 km north of Namibia’s capital city of Windhoek between the towns of Otjiwarongo and Otavi.

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Bella
Bella came to CCF in December 2017 and is about a year and a half old. Bella was kept as a pet on a private farm with a male cheetah, Katiti. After not having permits granted to continue keeping them from the Ministry of Environment and Tourism, the pair were handed over to CCF. Before arriving at CCF, the pair had a poor diet of chicken necks so have been transferred on to a diet of red meat with a vitamin and calcium supplement to help them grow and develop properly. Bella is very habituated to people and will always purr whenever people are around her. She is confident in nature and is learning quickly during her training sessions at CCF. Both Bella and Katiti are inseparable, spending most of their days together exploring the new enclosures and meeting other cheetahs.

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Darwin
Darwin came to CCF in April 2007 with five other cubs of the same age from a farm in Gobabis, close to the Botswana border. They were in a 4 x 8 meter cage, with no sun and a concrete floor. They had been separated from an adult female; most likely their mother. All the cubs had severe calcium deficiency and several had minor rickets and minor cataracts because of malnutrition. Although the cubs were about a year old, they appeared to be only 8 months because of their poor health. All of them got a lot better with a proper diet and lots of space to run around. Darwin along with his coalition mates – males Livingstone, Mendel and Fossey, and females Kayla and Kiana; were trapped after they had been seen hunting Blesbok and Springbok. Whether the cubs and the adult female were related is unclear but they were closely bonded to each other. Upon arriving at CCF it was decided to name the males after famous scientists and researchers and they are collectively known as the ‘Scientists’. We separated the Scientists from the two females because they were old enough to breed. Darwin is very easy to identify due to the very large white tip at the end of his tail. Also his ear tag is in the wrong ear; males are usually tagged in the right ear but his is in the left.

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Dominic
Dominic was orphaned in the Khomas region of Namibia. The Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET) contacted CCF and staff drove out to meet a farmer reporting that someone had dropped off a cub at her farm. The farmer was looking after the cub for about a week but she became concerned when the cub started to have health problems. The farmer was not able to provide the right level of care necessary for Dominic. It is unclear how he became separated from its mother. CCF staff picked up the cub and took it to a local vet for an initial assessment before bringing it back to CCF. The male cub is about 10-14 days old, its eyes are just open and doesn’t have its teeth yet. CCF staff prepared and sterilized a nursery area for the cub and began a feeding schedule of cat milk supplement every three hours. The little cub has been very responsive to care, it is very active with lots of chirping and purring at feeding time. It also sleeps very well and is getting plenty of rest and lots of special care from CCF staff.

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Fossey
Fossey came to CCF in April 2007 with five other cubs of the same age from a farm in Gobabis, close to the Botswana border. They were in a 4 x 8 meter cage, with no sun and a concrete floor. They had been separated from an adult female; most likely their mother. All the cubs had severe calcium deficiency and several had minor rickets and minor cataracts because of malnutrition. Although the cubs were about a year old, they appeared to be only 8 months because of their poor health. All of them got a lot better with a proper diet and lots of space to run around. Fossey along with his coalition mates – males Livingstone, Mendel and Darwin, and females Kayla and Kiana; were trapped after they had been seen hunting Blesbok and Springbok. Whether the cubs and the adult female were related is unclear but they were closely bonded to each other. Upon arriving at CCF it was decided to name the males after famous scientists and researchers and they are collectively known as the ‘Scientists’. We separated the Scientists from the two females because they were old enough to breed. Fossey has a very fluffy tail with a small white tip. He also has a slight scar running down the right side of his nose.

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Harry
Harry came to CCF in September 2005 from south Otjiwarongo with HER two siblings, Ron and Hermione. CCF was called by a farmer who had hand-captured two cubs with a third still out in the bush by herself. They were easily caught, due to their young age and weak condition. It appeared they had lost their mother. Sadly, her fate remains unknown. The third cub was caught a week later. Harry is named after J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter character, because when she arrived she had a small lightning-bolt-shaped scratch under her right eye. She is very shy around people and will wait until her siblings, Ron and Hermione, approach new people first.

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Hermione
Hermione came to CCF in September 2005 from south Otjiwarongo with her two siblings, Ron and Harry. CCF was called by a farmer who had hand-captured two cubs. The third was still out in the bush. It appeared that they had lost our mother. Sadly, her fate remains unknown. The third cub was caught a week later. Hermione is named after one of the characters in the popular books by J.K. Rowling and is the smallest and darkest of the three siblings; also the most playful. She has a small teddy bear face and big dark eyes. She is very gentle by nature, but not as much as her brother Ron. She tends to follow Ron’s lead during feeding. Hermione is the most social and will chase her brother and sister around the pen even though she is much smaller.

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Katiti
Katiti came to CCF in December 2017 and is about a year old. Katiti, however not tame, was kept on a private farm with a very tame female cheetah, Bella. He had been castrated a couple months earlier. After not having permits granted to continue keeping them from the Ministry of Environment and Tourism, the pair were handed over to CCF. Before arriving at CCF, the pair had a poor diet of chicken necks so have been transferred on to a diet of red meat with a vitamin and calcium supplement to help them grow and develop properly. Katiti is quite a shy cheetah and is always keeping a close eye on what’s going on around him. He tends to follow Bella around everywhere she goes which is helping him gain confidence along with the close work of his keepers. Both Bella and Katiti are inseparable, spending most of their days together exploring the new enclosures and meeting other cheetahs.

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Khayjay
Khayjay is one of the four Okakarara Cubs, which were brought to CCF when they were only a few weeks old in 2010. Khayjay and his brother Peter and his sisters Senay and Tiger Lily live together at the CCF Center and are being specially trained to be Ambassador Cheetahs. They will meet visiting school groups, distinguished guests, farmers, and other people from all over Namibia, and will teach everyone they encounter about the cheetah and its race against extinction. Khayjay is one of the most enthusiastic runners among the OK Ambassadors, and enjoys the special treat of a bloodcicle – a frozen treat containing blood and meat bits.

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Koya
Koya came to CCF in July 2017 with his brother, Niko, they were about 6 months old. The two cubs had been at a small holding north of Otjiwarongo for over two months after being captured and sold to the people CCF received them from by the local butcher. The two cubs had been kept in a small chicken coop, fed a poor diet of offal and fatty meat with no calcium or vitamin supplementation and was suffering from early stage metabolic bone disease. Koya had had no exercise, so was very overweight, When the brothers first arrived, they were very nervous and cautious of people. Now, Koya is very confident and loves stalking birds. He always comes running over to greet his keepers and has learnt how to run on our lure course to stay fit and healthy. He spends most of his day with his brother Niko exploring their enclosure together and meeting other cheetahs here at the centre. Because the brothers will be resident cheetahs, they are going through some training with their keepers to make their life here as stress free as possible e.g. Crush cage training, injection/blood draw training, feeding at the centre with the other cheetahs and most importantly, making friends with the other cheetahs.

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Little C
Little C was orphaned at about six weeks old, and was kept alive by the big heart of a young Namibian boy. The boy, a young farm hand, found him in a tree not long after Little C’s sibling had been killed. The boy hid him in a chicken coop, and shared his food rations and goat milk with the small cheetah. The boy successfully hid him for nearly a week from his parents and the farm’s owner. His parents found out and notified CCF. Because of that little boy, Little C is now a resident cheetah at CCF. LittleC’s name was taken from Chewbaaka, our late cheetah ambassador, whom we affectionately called Big “C”. Little C arrived at CCF at just a few weeks old and was hand-reared. He is extremely comfortable around humans.

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Livingstone
Livingstone came to CCF in April 2007 with five other cubs of the same age from a farm in Gobabis, close to the Botswana border. They were in a 4 x 8 meter cage, with no sun and a concrete floor. They had been separated from an adult female; most likely their mother. All the cubs had severe calcium deficiency and several had minor rickets and minor cataracts because of malnutrition. Although the cubs were about a year old, they appeared to be only 8 months because of their poor health. All of them got a lot better with a proper diet and lots of space to run around. Livingstone along with his coalition mates – males Fossey, Mendel and Darwin, and females Kayla and Kiana; were trapped after they had been seen hunting Blesbok and Springbok. Whether the cubs and the adult female were related is unclear but they were closely bonded to each other. Upon arriving at CCF it was decided to name the males after famous scientists and researchers and they are collectively known as the ‘Scientists’. We separated the Scientists from the two females because they were old enough to breed. Livingstone is one of the smaller Scientists (along with Darwin) but is an extremely feisty character. He always approaches people in a distinctive hunched over posture and is not shy in coming up close and slapping his paws on the ground with hisses and spits. The spots on his forehead are often described as forming the letter ‘M’.

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Niko
Niko came to CCF in July 2017 with his brother, Koya, they were about 6 months old. The two cubs had been at a small holding north of Otjiwarongo for over two months after being captured and sold to the people CCF received them from by the local butcher. The two cubs had been kept in a small chicken coop, fed a poor diet of offal and fatty meat with no calcium or vitamin supplementation and was suffuring from early stage metabolic bone disease. Niko had had no exercise, so was very overweight, When the brothers first arrived, they were very nervous and cautious of people. Niko is the quieter of the two brothers, is much fluffier and is a very quick learner. He has learnt how to run on our lure course to make sure he stays fit and healthy. He spends most of his day with his brother Koya exploring their enclosure together and meeting other cheetahs. Because the brothers will be resident cheetahs, they are going through some training with their keepers to make their life here as stress free as possible e.g. Crush cage training, injection/blood draw training, feeding at the centre with the other cheetahs and most importantly, making friends with the other cheetahs.

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N’Dunge
N’Dunge and his brother Shunga were only two months’ old and orphaned when a farmer discovered them on his land. It was June 2008; they were wandering near the sheep and goat corral, and were considered threats to the livestock. Therefore, CCF was called to pick them up. N’Dunge (or Smart Man) was named by a volunteer that helped raise him because of his intelligent demeanor. He and his brother Shunga are virtually inseparable, and very difficult to tell apart. N’Dunge and his brother spend their time lounging around in the sun. N’Dunge has a small build and a perfect cheetah face, with tear-marks that run precisely to the corners of his mouth.

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Peter
Peter was caught by a farmer in the Khomas Hochland area, east of Windhoek, when he was about one year old. CCF does not know what happened to the rest of his family as he was too young to be on his own at that stage. The farmer gave him to a lodge, and he was kept there as a companion for their tame cheetah. However, they never got along and after a year the farmer decided he did not want Peter anymore. CCF fetched Peter in June 2006.

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Phoenix
Phoenix’s mother was shot by a farmer who saw her as a threat to his livestock in August 2008. When the farmer saw movement in the mother’s stomach he decided to cut out the four cubs who were just about due to be born. The four cubs’ existence was then discovered by a concerned neighbour who took the cubs from the farmer and brought them straight to CCF. At only two days old the four cubs were very weak and sadly one of them died. Fortunately the remaining three, two males and one female, pulled through and showed no ill effect from their traumatic start in life. The female was named Soraya which was chosen by the lady who rescued the cubs and brought them to CCF. Soraya is the Persian name for the star cluster that we call “The Pleiades” or “The Seven Sisters”. In keeping with this celestial theme the two males were named Phoenix and Quasar. Unfortunately, in 2013 Quasar passed away and Soraya escaped her enclosure, but Phoenix still remains at CCF and is loved by all of his keepers.

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Polly
CCF had been following Polly’s mom via satellite radio collar for a year; and in July 2009 a farmer called to say the mother was found dead. CCF staff knew that she had cubs, so, working with the farmer, they set catch cages and caught Polly with her three siblings after about a week. They were ~3 months’ old. They now live at CCF. Polly is the only female of the four cubs, and is named after Polly Hix, a donor of CCF. She is playful and never misses an opportunity to pounce on and wrestle her brothers until they respond and play with her.

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Rainbow
In February, 2013, a local farmer had found Rainbow by the side of the road and had brought her back to his farm. After a week of trying to nurture her back to health, he called CCF to pick her up. CCF found Rainbow in a small cage. She was frightened, and while the farmer had been able to give her a little food during the week, she was very thin. She was given the name Rainbow, in honor of the bright rainbows that had appeared in the sky during the more than three hour drive it took to retrieve her. Rainbow is one of a pair of cubs that have formed a coalition of sorts after both were rescued from different farms. She and her coalition mate, Aurora, are adjusting well to life at CCF and are quite popular with our visitors.

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Rohini Talalla
Rohini came to CCF as a tiny cub and received a lot of tender care from Dr. Marker and the rest of the CCF staff. Rohini was named for one of CCF’s supporters who at the time was living in Namibia. Rohini is a strong and beautiful cheetah, and loves to run. She enjoys chasing the lure on our running course, and visitors enjoy watching her. Her natural grace and her feisty attitude make her a favorite among the CCF family.

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Romeo
Romeo was a farmer’s longtime family pet. The farmer and his wife had to leave their home for assisted living and released Romeo into CCF’s care. Although he was very well cared for and is a very sweet cheetah, the practice of taking cheetah cubs as pets is generally not allowed. We are thankful that he was so well cared for and that the farmer entrusted CCF with Romeo’s future care. He will be integrated into CCF’s other orphans and hopefully create some lifelong bonds with members of his own species.

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Ron
In September 2005, CCF received a call from a farmer who had caught three two-month old cubs. He caught Hermione first, Ron three days later, and Harry four days after that. The cubs were very weak and had apparently lost their mother, whose fate remains unknown. Ron is named after one of the characters in the popular books by J.K. Rowling. Much like his namesake, Ron is one of most comedic cats at the Centre, pulling at his siblings legs or stealing food right from under their noses. He loves to be the big brother of the Hogwarts trio. He often chases his sisters around the pen for play, preferring to chase them than chasing lures. Ron’s distinguishing marks are his kinked tail and almond-shaped eyes, which are a very light amber color.

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Sasha
Sasha came to CCF in January 2018 at around 5 months old. She was rescued by a farmer who found her on his farm sick and weak. She was turned over to CCF for rehabilitation. During her first week at CCF, she had a routine checkup and a mass was found in her stomach. She had emergency surgery to remove it, which turned out to be a chewed up rubber ball. After rest and care from her keepers, she recovered very well. Since her surgery she has moved to a much larger enclosure and is growing up fast. She’s very feisty and likes to let everyone know how she’s feeling with her loud chirps and calls. She loves to sit up on the highest mound in her enclosure so she can watch over all the other cheetahs and see when more treats are coming. She is learning to play and run and will introduced to some of the other cheetahs once she is a bit older and bigger.

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Senay
Senay is one of the four Okakarara Cubs, which were brought to CCF when they were only a few weeks old in 2010. Senay and her brothers Khayjay and Peter and her sister Tiger Lily live together at the CCF Center and are being specially trained to be Ambassador Cheetahs. They will meet visiting school groups, distinguished guests, farmers, and other people from all over Namibia, and will teach everyone they encounter about the cheetah and its race against extinction. Senay loves to keep company with her siblings and works very cooperatively with her handlers.

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Shunga
Shunga and his brother N’dunge were found without a mother in the Gobabis region and were brought to CCF in July 2008 at the age of 3 months. A farmer found the two wandering near the sheep and goat corral, and considered them a threat to his livestock. They were found without a mother, and were therefore caught and brought back to CCF where they were hand-raised by CCF staff. The two brothers were very quickly introduced to another young cat called little C and the three have forged quite a bond and are now almost inseparable. Shunga (or Blonde Man) was named so by a volunteer because of his light-colored coat, and other than that one, slight difference, he and his brother N’Dunga are virtually impossible to tell apart. Almost like identical twins, the two stick together through thick and thin. Shunga is a very laid-back cat, usually sleeping through the day near his brother. As a runner, Shunga has a beautiful stride and always acts as if chasing the lure were the best game ever invented.

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Tiger Lily
Tiger Lily is one of the four Okakarara Cubs, which were brought to CCF when they were only a few weeks old in 2010. Senay and her brothers Khayjay and Peter and her sister Senay live together at the CCF Center and are being specially trained to be Ambassador Cheetahs. They will meet visiting school groups, distinguished guests, farmers, and other people from all over Namibia, and will teach everyone they encounter about the cheetah and its race against extinction. Tiger Lily loves to chase the lure and keep company with her siblings and works very cooperatively with her handlers.

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